ADCC: Deed-Based Warrior Subclasses

That’s Advanced Dungeon Crawl Classics (ADCC) – credit for the acronym goes to Ryan Colby.

by InferalFinn

A while back I posted my take on the Ranger for DCC, inspired by Crawl! Fanzine #6, which also featured DCC versions of the paladin, bard, and gnome. I’ve actually had someone just start playing a ranger in my game, and I’m already seeing some problems. I’m not sure that the problems are with my own design (though they could be). The thing is, the ranger as a separate class is really dependent on the style of play to have value at the table. If there’s lots of dungeon crawling going on and the monsters don’t fit the favored enemy, then the class seems like it kind of sucks compared to the others.

More than that, though, DCC has really brought me around to seeing the simple elegance of the four basic classes for humans (it’s also really brought me around on race as class, as I’ve mentioned before). And it occurred to me last Friday morning, as I was pouring my coffee and about to leave for work, that there’s a simpler way to add rangers, paladins, barbarians and the like to DCC with more mechanics than just role-playing but less than a separate class. And that way is through my most favorite of DCC rules, the Mighty Deed of Arms.

Continue reading “ADCC: Deed-Based Warrior Subclasses”

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An Age Undreamed of…

Originally posted by Brianna Heine on the other (now defunct) version of this site.

h-thuria04

So I want to take this time to provide a short outline of the posts I intend to write. I think it’s important to have a plan especially with a project this big. There are already a plethora of d20 and Hyborian Age sources to reference. Hex Ox also reminded me of the d20 Hyborian Age Campaign site.  I will be reading as much of the material I can get my hands on for each topic and will present my thoughts at the end of each post. One thing I want to do is reserve judgment on a rule until after the readers have their say. We’ve all read the same stories but I’m certain some of you see things from a different angle than I do. We also can’t forget my golden rule; if it’s too complicated it’s probably wrong.

Many d20 products start of their game with the following format so I think I’ll follow it as well.

Continue reading “An Age Undreamed of…”

Who’s the High Chief in These Parts? (Random Table)

The PCs have bumped into some barbarians, and they’re either parleying or are already defeated and being hauled back to the village. Who do these guys answer to? I put this together with the Arcturun High Chiefs of the home game in mind, but it is certainly generic enough to work for just about any fantasy setting.

d12 First Name Clan Part 1 Clan Part 2 Trait
1 Undrol Big River Significant portion of body covered with burn scars
2 Hathor Dead Eagle Missing tongue, but very capable of getting a point across
3 Grundas Feathered Axe Blessedly hirsute
4 Toktri Little Wolf Runes of warding tattooed on face
5 Jarth Blood Rock One empty eye socket surrounded by severe scarring
6 Yontoth Mountain Cleave Angrily growls or shouts pretty much everything
7 Arnda Grey Bear Blind, but has yet to lose a duel
8 Rogdek Split Sky Majority of nose chopped off
9 Stuldar Black Tree Nude most of the time
10 Fendrin Savage Hill Extremely soft spoken and stoic, even when angry
11 Mayrtolk Broken Moon Intensely spiritual and faithful
12 Nelthek Brown Skull Cannibal, but only with people of different ethnicity/race

Who’s the Toughest Warrior-Type Person in the Area? (Random Table)

After I posted my randomly generated city map, my buddy Bryan and I had an exchange about why I think Vornheim is better than the random city charts in the 3E DMG. Basically, I think it comes down to a philosophical difference: Vornheim is designed to help you come up with an answer you need when your players put you on the spot, whereas the 3E DMG tables were designed to be used ahead of time to give you info that there was a good chance you’d never need. As Bry put it, “Knowing there are four 1st level clerics, two 2nd level clerics and one 4th level cleric really wasn’t all that important.” It also helps that Vornheim is basically system-neutral, despite having some old-school compatible stats listed in a few spots.

However, he got me thinking about this a bit more, and I realized that sometimes it might be helpful to quickly determine who the biggest fish is in a given pond. Once you know who that is, you’ve probably got a good sense of who else might be kicking around beneath them.

So presented here is the first of my random tables designed to determine who the toughest character of a certain type is in an area, this one covering warriors. The definition of an “area” is whatever you need it to be.

Roll 2d20, use one to determine who they are and the other to determine how tough they are:

How Tough is the Toughest Warrior-Type Person in the Area?

1-2: 3rd level / Novice rank with a couple advancements
3-7: 5th level / Seasoned rank
8-13: 7th level / Veteran rank
14-18: 9th level / Heroic rank
19-20: 10th level plus / Legendary rank

Who is the Toughest Warrior-Type Person in the Area?

  1. Ex-military type haunted by the past; quiet and solitary.
  2. Ex-military type atoning for a sense of guilt by protecting the defenseless.
  3. Ex-military type with fond recollections of the glory days; regales anyone who listens with old war stories.
  4. Ex-military type who wields power and influence through intimidation and sadistic action.
  5. Mercenary with a heart of gold … literally. A clockwork golem of such magnificent and meticulous design that few will ever know its true nature; slew its creator centuries ago.
  6. Church Knight who lives by humble example and cares for the needy and sick.
  7. Church Knight with a hardline “fire and brimstone” attitude.
  8. Church Knight who is secretly aligned with a blasphemous heresy/cult.
  9. Ranger who protects the locals from a distance but rarely interacts with them.
  10. Ranger who protects the wilderness from the “threat” of civilization; known to kill locals who venture into the wilds.
  11. Ranger who is really just passing through. The toughest actual local is 2 levels / 1 rank lower; roll again to determine personality.
  12. Barbarian mercenary with a penchant for carousing.
  13. Barbarian berserker seeking peace and quiet; troublemakers won’t like it when he’s angry.
  14. Barbarian braggart who talks at no end about personal prowess, especially while engaged in combat.
  15. Swashbuckler who patrols the night, protecting the innocent.
  16. Swashbuckler who makes grandiose public displays; highly delusional.
  17. Hunter of the supernatural; well-educated and extremely pragmatic.
  18. Hunter of the supernatural; overly suspicious to the point of paranoia.
  19. Tomb robber (aka “adventurer”) equipped with myriad methods of murder; favors a crossbow.
  20. Doppelgänger; roll again to see who it replaced.